SEED STARTING AND HOW TO MAKE NEWSPAPER SEED POTS

Seed starting is a family affair and a great spring time activity in anticipation of gardening season. Learn how to create your own DIY newspaper seed pots for garden seeds. Re-purpose, re-use, and recycle with newspaper seedling pots. | EveryDayCare

Care giving means so many different things to so many different people. It can mean total care, it can mean providing food and shelter, it can also mean caring for someone while they’re not feeling so good, it can mean little acts of care the list could go on and on. I like to think of it as encompassing various responsibilities and activities that are a part of daily life, as well as activities that enrich our lives as a family. Part of caring for our family means trying to make sure we’re all eating healthy foods. That means when spring comes, making our annual seed order (and this year an order of a rooster to protect our growing flock), so we can set our garden in motion. Seed starting is a family affair.

By the time we’re done, our dining room will probably be filled to the gills with trays of seedlings waiting to be planted.

We recently started the process of planting all the seeds that need to be planted indoors prior to placing them in the ground outside. We started with peppers and tomatoes. Dan had learned, in one of our gardening groups, that newspaper makes great little seed pots… Not only that, but it’s a great way to re-purpose newspaper. We actually don’t pay for a newspaper, so we ran to a convenience store in town and picked up a few papers for 50 cents apiece – much cheaper than seed pots would have been for all the seeds we need to plant.

Supplies You Need for Seed Starting

You really don’t need that many supplies; in fact, it’s more affordable than people think. With a little creativity and re-purposing, you can save a LOT of money.

  • Seeds – We prefer heirloom seeds because then we can harvest our seeds and re-plant the next year.
  • Newspapers – How many depends on how big your garden will be.
  • Seed starting trays, with or without lids – We picked up plain seed starting trays, no lids, at our local hydroponics store.
  • 1 regular-sized tin can
  • Scissors or box cutters
  • Potting Soil Mix – This will probably be the most expensive item on your list.
  • Water

How to Make Newspaper Seed Pots

Making newspaper seed pots is so simple. If there are a few of you working together, you can start an assembly line and help each other, making the process go by even more quickly

Making your seed pots… Take a regular-sized tin can and use that to measure and roll the newspaper into a sort of pot.

Seed starting is a family affair and a great spring time activity in anticipation of gardening season. Learn how to create your own DIY newspaper seed pots for garden seeds. Re-purpose, re-use, and recycle with newspaper seedling pots. | EveryDayCare

Fold your bottom end up, closing it in.

Seed starting is a family affair and a great spring time activity in anticipation of gardening season. Learn how to create your own DIY newspaper seed pots for garden seeds. Re-purpose, re-use, and recycle with newspaper seedling pots.

hen fold your top down over the top, creating a crease so it’s easier to fold down once you remove the can. Unfold that top fold and remove the can from your seedling pot.

Seed starting is a family affair and a great spring time activity in anticipation of gardening season. Learn how to create your own DIY newspaper seed pots for garden seeds. Re-purpose, re-use, and recycle with newspaper seedling pots.

Following that crease, fold the top back down. Fill each newspaper pot with dirt, and place in an empty seed-starting tray.

Seed starting is a family affair and a great spring time activity in anticipation of gardening season. Learn how to create your own DIY newspaper seed pots for garden seeds. Re-purpose, re-use, and recycle with newspaper seedling pots.

 

you can fit 21 pots in one seed starter tray; you definitely want the tray, so when you water the seeds, it can hold the excess water.

Seed starting is a family affair and a great spring time activity in anticipation of gardening season. Learn how to create your own DIY newspaper seed pots for garden seeds. Re-purpose, re-use, and recycle with newspaper seedling pots.

Once you have your pots made and filled with soil, it’s time 

Seed starting is a family affair and a great spring time activity in anticipation of gardening season. Learn how to create your own DIY newspaper seed pots for garden seeds. Re-purpose, re-use, and recycle with newspaper seedling pots.to plant your seeds

Seed starting is a family affair and a great spring time activity in anticipation of gardening season. Learn how to create your own DIY newspaper seed pots for garden seeds. Re-purpose, re-use, and recycle with newspaper seedling pots.

Then be sure to water and place in a sunny spot indoors.

Dan has another seed tray set-up in the garage underneath a grow light. He’s already got some lettuce coming up. We have so many plans for this spring and summer… These little seedlings get me so excited for the season ahead.

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4 Beginner Gardening Mistakes to Avoid

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Even if you have really good soil and a lot of sunlight, there are still plenty of beginner gardening mistakes you can make that can keep your garden from turning out the way you had envisioned it would be.

I have rocky, sandy soil and a lot more shade than sun, so my poor little garden is already at a bit of a disadvantage, and my first few years I made plenty of beginner gardening mistakes.

Let’s just say it’s a good thing I’m not trying to depend on my garden to be my only source of food! I can only imagine the pressure that farmers and homesteaders must have felt back in the days when the success of their crops would decide whether they would go hungry that winter or not.

I still make plenty of mistakes now, too. When things get busy, I don’t put quite as much time into properly preparing the soil like I know I should. And there usually comes a point in the summer when it’s just so hot and humid that I basically give up on weeding completely.

Over the years, though, I’ve gradually learned how to make my garden a little bit more successful. It’s still pretty small, and it’s definitely not going to win any prizes for being the prettiest or the most neatly organized garden, but it’s a lot better than it used to be!

These four beginner gardening mistakes are all ones that I’ve made, and, if this is your first year gardening, hopefully you can avoid making the same mistakes I did and have a better chance at a successful first garden!

4 Beginner Gardening Mistakes to Avoid:

1) Planting Too Many Varieties of Veggies

When you’re just starting out with a garden, it’s a good idea to keep it as simple as possible for the first year. It’s tempting to want to try a little of everything, but you’ll have a much better chance of having a successful garden if you focus on just a few varieties for the first year and then add in others the next year.

When I first started ordering heirloom seeds online, I went a little bit overboard that first year. I wanted to try them all, and I ordered far too many of them. It was a lot to try to keep track of them all, and I ended up not having the time to really learn about how each type should be planted and what type of growing conditions they needed, etc.

Now that I’ve had a garden for a few years, I’ve figured out what types of plants do well in my yard and which ones don’t, but if I could go back to the year I first started a garden, I would have been better off just trying a few simple, easy-to-grow varieties like peas and beans.

2) Crowding Plants Too Close Together

This kind of goes along with the first mistake. If you’ve tried to plant too many varieties, you’re probably also trying to squeeze as many seeds or seedlings into your garden space as possible.

My first year gardening, I had visions of a huge harvest, and I packed the seeds as closely together as possible, thinking I would have more produce that way. I also didn’t thin out the seedlings properly after the seeds had sprouted because I hated the thought of pulling out perfectly healthy plants.

Instead of a huge, productive harvest, though, I ended with up weak, straggly-looking plants, and I could barely find room to step between them without destroying them (since I had forgotten about planning enough space to walk around them too.)

The moral of the story: less equals more. Fewer plants spaced further apart will end up being healthier and producing more fruit than plants crowded together.

3) Watering Plants Too Often, or at the Wrong Time of Day

I’ve been guilty of this mistake many times. It’s easy to worry so much about whether your plants are getting enough water that you end up giving them too much water by mistake. Some plants do need more water than others, but generally they do better with fewer, more thorough waterings (like they would get if if were raining) than they do with getting a shower from the hose every time you walk by and think they look even a little bit thirsty.

It’s also generally considered best to water in the earlier part of the day rather than in the evening because watering at night could contribute to the growth of fungus, especially for plants that don’t do well in very damp conditions.

4) Planting the Wrong Varieties Next to Each Other

If you feel like you’ve tried everything and you still can’t figure out why your garden isn’t thriving, it might be that you’re planting the wrong varieties next to each other.

Certain types of plants do really well when they are together, helping to keep away insects and pests or by helping to enrich the soil. Others plants, though, may actually inhibit the growth of the plants that they are near.

By using companion planting and planning your garden to keep together the varieties that work well with each other, you have a better chance of having a successful garden.

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Tips for Growing Cauliflower in Your Garden

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If you are a fan of cauliflower, you might want to consider growing your own. After all, how tasty is cauliflower with melted cheese, or roasted in the oven with herbs? If you want to try growing your own cauliflower this year so you always have it on hand, take a look below at tips for growing cauliflower in your garden. While growing your own cauliflower takes a little work, you will find that the end result is well worth it.

Tips for Growing Cauliflower in Your Garden

How to start cauliflower from seed:

Cauliflower is a slow growing plant, so starting seeds indoors is advised. Use seed starters to get the seeds germinating early. Plant your seeds in starters ½ an inch deep, and in rows that are about 4-6 inches apart. Be generous with your plantings, as you can always thin out the weaker plants later.

How to transplant cauliflower seedlings:

When your seedlings are a few inches tall, and the spring is still young, you can transplant your seedlings outdoors. Choose an area with clean, rich soil and moderate sunlight. When transplanting your cauliflower seedlings, plant them 6-8 inches apart and in rows that are at least a foot apart. This way, you can easily access the cauliflower heads when it is time to harvest.

How to care for cauliflower seedlings:

Once you transplant the seedlings, they will need your regular care. They require regular fertilizing, so be sure to feed them every 4-6 weeks. A phosphate rich fertilizer is preferred by cauliflower and can really help them reach their full potential. The seedlings require moist soil, but do not do well in standing water. Water every few days in short spurts to make sure they get the hydration they need.

Remember, seedlings can always be thinned out if overcrowding seems to be an issue. Just weed out the weaker of the seedlings and leave the stronger.

General tips for producing a good crop:

Cauliflower will attract a variety of pests and wildlife, so be sure you check for pests regularly and hand remove them. You also want to be sure to have netting or fencing in place to keep animals out. Also, don’t be afraid of fertilizer. Cauliflower is a slow growing plant and it can use the help that fertilizers offer.

While cauliflower is a cool weather plant, extreme frost can cause damage to it. If you are expecting and extreme drop in temperatures, you may wish to cover your plants until the threat has passed.

When and how to harvest cauliflower:

Harvesting cauliflower requires a few steps. First, when the heads of the plant are about 3 inches in diameter, take some twine and tie all of the leaves together. This will help the head get more exposure. And “blanch.” When the head reaches about 6-8 inches in diameter, it can be cut at the base.

Now that your cauliflower is harvested, you just need to figure out how to serve it! As you will find, you have so many tasty options.

Give these tips for growing cauliflower a try and see what fun growing this tasty vegetable can be.

5 Golden Rules of Garden Planning

It’s never too late to plan a garden, even if you’ve missed the early spring sowing dates. The first secret to a super-productive garden is a well-planned garden. This avoids common issues that affect the health and productivity of your plants.

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Plan For Success:

Using the Garden Planner, you can easily identify the best growing position for each plant’s needs by simply moving them around until you get the perfect layout.

Is your garden as productive as it could be? Plan for success! Using the Garden Planner, you can easily identify the best growing position for each plant’s needs by moving them around until you get the perfect layout.

In this short video we explain the 5 golden rules of garden planning to help you to avoid many of the pitfalls and grow your most productive garden yet

Rule 1: Provide the right growing environment

Full sun is essential for most veggies. For shady areas, choose crops such as leafy salads and greens.

Ensure you soil is fertile, moisture retentive yet well-drained by regularly mulching with or digging in compost.

Rule 2: Grow what you like!

Concentrate on the fruits and vegetables you love to eat. By growing your own you can choose varieties that promise exceptional taste and quality.

Rule 3: Make the most of the space you have

Choose vegetables that are hard to find in the grocery store, or expensive to buy.

Many types and varieties of fruits and vegetables are well-suited to growing in containers. Miniature varieties of vegetables, naturally compact salads and dwarf fruit trees can all be grown in pots.

You can use our Garden Planner to maximize the use of garden space. The Planner will show you exactly how many of each vegetable or fruit you can grow within the space available to you, without overcrowding them.

Rule 4: Make gardening easy

Opt for varieties that are suited to your growing conditions and the time and resources you have available. Pest and disease resistance is worth seeking out.

Place your vegetable garden or containers close to the house to make it easier to tend and harvest. Install water barrels to collect rainwater from greenhouse or shed roofs. Paths between beds should be wide enough for a wheelbarrow, while beds should be of the right proportions for easy maintenance and crop rotation.

Rule 5: Timing is of the essence

Sow quick-growing crops at one- or two-week intervals to spread harvests out and ensure that your garden is achieving its full potential. Harvest prolific croppers such as pole beans little and often to encourage more produce to follow.